The Buckeye State’s economy is growing while its unemployment rate is going down, which is positive news for students who plan to attend one of the many high-quality accredited computer science degree programs in Ohio. Even more encouraging is the fact that a half dozen computer professions are listed on the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Service’s “Buckeye Top 50” – a ranking of the high-wage jobs that are in the greatest demand in the state. Prospective students who want to train for those promising computer science and engineering careers will find many excellent educational options within the state. Many Ohio universities offer advanced study in these fields, allowing students to earn degrees at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels. To see more accredited computer science degree programs in Ohio, visit Computer Science Degree Programs in Ohio (A-O).

The Ohio State University

College of Engineering

Ohio State is one of America’s largest universities, with more than 56,000 students at its main campus and 6600 students at five branch locations. The institution was among the top 20 public universities in the country on U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 list of America’s best colleges. Its computer science and engineering program also received accolades in that report, ranking in the top 15 of the nation’s public institutions. Ohio State’s main campus spans more than 1700 acres and includes 14 different colleges. Originally founded as a land-grant institution in 1870, the university takes pride in its long tradition of educational, research, and athletic excellence. New graduates from the school’s accredited computer science degree programs in Ohio will join a network of about 465,000 living alumni around the globe.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering

The goal of the computer science program is to prepare graduates for jobs as practicing engineers by offering broad-based technical curriculum and specialized engineering classes. Every student is required to take basic science, engineering, and mathematics courses. The core classes include subjects such as programming and software development, data structures, programming languages, operating systems, numerical methods, and theory of computation. Students who have no programming background may select a slightly different slate of classes than those who have prior programming experience. A student with extensive programming expertise may take a placement test in order to “opt out” of certain introductory courses. In addition, students may select from three specialties — software systems, hardware-software systems, or information systems. The students choose from a variety of technical electives in order to focus on these specialty areas.

Minor in Computer and Information Science

If students are majoring in another subject but have an interest in computer science, they can supplement their studies with a minor in computer and information science (CIS). This minor introduces eligible students to a variety of topics that are valuable in a business setting, including software development and design and programming in Java and C++. To qualify for the minor designation, students are required to take a minimum of 13 credit hours in computer science. These mandatory classes are grouped into three categories: programming fundamentals, CIS core, and technical electives. Students must take two prerequisite courses, a CIS foundations course, and a class on professionalism and ethics in computing. Minor candidates also must select at least six credit hours from a list of permitted electives.

Master of Science in Computer Science and Engineering

Master’s degree students can choose a research track or a coursework track. The research option focuses on developing a student’s ability to conduct independent research in computing. In order to receive this degree, students must complete a master’s thesis based on original research. The goal of the coursework track is to help students develop the skills needed to be practicing computer science professionals. These master’s candidates are required to take a larger number of classes and to successfully complete a comprehensive written examination. Students with excellent academic records also may pursue a combined bachelor’s and master’s degree program which allows students to begin graduate courses before receiving their undergraduate degree. This option may help students to earn a master’s degree more quickly. To be eligible for this track, students must have taken at least 90 undergraduate credit hours and must have a minimum 3.5 cumulative point hour ratio based on graded classes taken at the university.

Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering

The Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science and Engineering is awarded to students who demonstrate excellent academic and research skills, so only top-notch candidates are accepted into the program. The program’s goal is to train prospective graduates to become leading educators and researchers in industrial and academic settings. Students must take a qualifying examination unless they receive an acceleration exemption based on grades in core coursework. Doctoral students take a selection of core classes, a set of major courses, and classes in two minor concentration areas. The selected minor areas may be chosen from disciplines in other departments, such as psychology. Every doctoral student works under the direction of a faculty member to produce noteworthy research and to complete a dissertation. Students also must successfully complete both written and oral candidacy examinations.

Accreditations
• Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET
• Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET

Contact
Ohio State University College of Engineering
122 Hitchcock Hall
2070 Neil Ave.
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-2836
askabuckeye@osu.edu
https://engineering.osu.edu/computerscience

The University of Toledo

College of Engineering

The University of Toledo was founded in 1872 as a private school focusing on excellence in the arts and trades. Today the school is a state university with a much broader mission and more than 300 wide-ranging undergraduate, graduate and professional academic programs. The research institution is known particularly for its programs in medical fields, engineering and the sciences. The Toledo campus spans about 1400 acres and includes more than 100 buildings. About 16,800 students are enrolled at the undergraduate level. The university’s engineering college has garnered praise for its academic programs in several publications. The Princeton Review ranked the College of Engineering’s graduate programs at 18th in the country. U.S. News & World Report rated the school’s online graduate engineering program as 33rd in the nation.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering

Toledo’s computer science major is offered through the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. While both of these disciplines share a mathematical and scientific foundation, the computer science program focuses primarily on computer-related applications. Students gain expertise in subjects such as programming languages, computer systems design, software engineering, and networking. Every computer science major takes core electives in the humanities and social sciences, including college composition and introduction to logic. Basic courses in calculus and chemistry are prerequisites for more advanced study in computer-related topics. Engineering students have 24-hour access to 14 computer labs with about 420 computers. The college also offers a co-op program where students can get three to five semesters of on-the-job experience while attending college.

Accreditations

• Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET
• Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET

Contact
Nitschke Hall, MS 310
1610 N. Westwood
Toledo, OH 43607
(419) 530-8000
enroll@utoledo.edu
http://www.eng.utoledo.edu/

University of Cincinnati

College of Engineering and Applied Science

Founded in 1819, the University of Cincinnati (UC) is a public research institution in an urban setting that was dubbed one of the nation’s most beautiful campuses by Forbes. The university is widely known as the institution where the concept of cooperative education was launched in 1906. At that time, the college began requiring engineering students to get hands-on job experience while attending classes in alternating time periods. Those opportunities are still offered to students today, and the school’s co-op program is ranked fourth in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. About 21,598 undergraduates attend the university. The College of Engineering and Applied Science lists its missions as excellence in education, knowledge creation, transfer of learning and technology to the community, and accessibility. The college, which is home to several of the accredited computer science degree programs in Ohio, offers many co-op opportunities and small class sizes.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

UC’s computer science program is completed over a five-year period, allowing students to alternate between their campus academic classes and mandatory work experience offered through the co-op program. These co-op sessions take place in the second, third and fourth years of study. Every engineering freshman takes a similar set of required courses that includes mathematics, physics, and English. Over the course of study, computer science students also take classes on topics such as programming languages, database design, software engineering, and technical writing. Students design a special project during their senior year. The goal of the program is to prepare students either for employment or for graduate work after they complete their studies.

Master of Engineering in Computer Science

Students who want to study computer science at the graduate level can choose to pursue either a Master of Engineering or a Master of Science degree. The difference between their two programs is their post-graduation focus. The engineering master’s program is described as “practice-oriented,” turning out graduates whose goals are to join the technical workforce as computer science professionals. Students in this program will take a minimum of 30 semester credit hours, including professional skills core courses and technical track classes. They also must design and complete a final “capstone project” that showcases advanced engineering solutions. A thesis is not required for the engineering master’s degree. An accelerated engineering degree also is available through the ACCEND program, which enables students to earn both the bachelor’s and master’s degree in five years.

Master of Science in Computer Science

UC’s Master of Science in Computer Science differs from the school’s engineering option because of its focus on the academic research experience. Unlike the engineering master’s, computer science graduate students are required to complete a thesis or dissertation under the supervision of one of the college’s full-time faculty members. These graduate candidates must take a total of 30 credit hours, including both high-level coursework and nine credits for thesis research. The curriculum focus for computer science students is on developing algorithms, software, data management and analysis systems.

Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering

Earning a Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science and Engineering at UC is typically a three-year, full-time program, and part-time studies are discouraged. The program requires no less than 60 graduate semester credits beyond the master’s level or no less than 90 semester credits beyond the bachelor’s level. In addition to advanced computer science classes, the program requires 30 credit hours towards the student’s research for the required doctoral dissertation. Ph.D. students must take and pass a doctoral qualifying examination after their first year in the program. The students can only be admitted into candidacy for their doctorate after successful defense of a dissertation proposal.

Accreditations
• Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET
• Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET

Contact
College of Engineering and Applied Science
2901 Woodside Drive,
Cincinnati OH 45221
(513) 556-5417
Admissions@uc.edu
http://secs.ceas.uc.edu/

Wright State University

College of Engineering and Computer Science

When Wright State University was established in 1964, it was founded as the Dayton branch campus of two of the state’s older public institutions – Miami University and Ohio State University. In those days, the campus was comprised of just one building. Today, Wright State is an independent, public school with more than 14,000 undergraduate students and almost 3000 graduate students. The institution, which was granted full university status in 1967, is located on a 557-acre campus in the suburban community of Fairborn near Dayton. The regionally accredited university has six colleges, a medical school and a school of professional psychology. It offers more than 150 degree programs at the undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, and professional levels.

Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science

Wright State offers both a Bachelor of Arts (BA) and a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in computer science, with some variation in the focus and required coursework for each alternative. The BA program is designed for prospective students who hope to find careers in areas such as programming, network administration, website development, and computer systems analysis. This track has fewer mandatory classes in upper-level mathematics and science, yet still prepares graduates to apply computer technology in the workplace. Students who select this option are required to take general core classes in areas like English, global traditions, social science, and natural science. Specialized degree classes include topics such as web design fundamentals, introduction to PC networking, technical communications, data structures and algorithms, and introduction to the design of technical systems.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

Wright State introduced its BS degree in computer science in 1968 at a time when the discipline was just gaining recognition around the nation. The program is designed to teach students about the design and development of software systems and to introduce them to essential mathematical skills, computer science theories, and algorithmic principles. Like the BA program, the BS degree requires core classes in English and reading, statistical concepts, natural science, and social science. The roster of specialized classes includes subjects such as operating systems internals and design, introduction to software engineering, calculus II, comparative languages and linear algebra. Team project classes are scheduled in the senior year.

Master of Science in Computer Science

Wright State offers both a traditional master’s degree in computer science and a combined BS/MS program that allows students to earn both degrees in five years. The master’s degree focuses on software design and analysis, balancing theory and practice in an academic program that boasts an excellent faculty and top-notch computer science laboratories. Master’s candidates must complete 30 graduate credit hours in computer science and computer engineering. In addition, students may choose between thesis or non-thesis academic tracks. The thesis option can include up to three hours of independent study and nine hours of thesis research. In the non-thesis option, students earn a larger percentage of their credits through academic coursework. Both options require a computer science core of classes.

Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering

A Doctor of Philosophy degree in Computer Science at Wright State requires that students concentrate their academic study and research in a specific computer science or computer engineering area. Entering students should already be knowledgeable about programming languages, operating systems, computer system design, and data structures. Doctoral students who have already earned a master’s degree must complete at least 60 credit hours to receive their Ph.D. Those who enter with only a bachelor’s degree will need 90 credit hours. Wright State offers most doctoral classes in late afternoon so that working professionals can participate in the program after business hours and on a part-time basis. Candidates must participate in residency research, must publish journal or conference papers, and must successfully complete a dissertation.

Accreditations
• Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET

Contact
Wright State University
Russ Engineering Center 405
3640 Colonel Glenn Highway
Dayton, Ohio, 45435
(937) 775-5001
cecs-dean@wright.edu
http://cecs.wright.edu

Whatever a student’s academic goals may be, the Buckeye State has plenty of options for those who want to pursue careers in technical fields. The wide variety of accredited computer science degree programs in Ohio can be a gateway to the future for students who are interested in this growing field of study.

Leave a Reply