Washington D.C. is not only home to centers of all three branches of the federal government and the president of the United States, but also to several top colleges and universities offering accredited degrees in computer science in the District of Columbia. Imagine being able to study some of the latest developments in computer science and technology in the heart of the nation’s capital, where degrees such as these can lead to numerous job and career opportunities, whether you seek a government jobs or want to become part of the cultural and historical establishments that also make up the landscape in D.C.

Howard University

College of Engineering, Architecture & Computer Sciences

The College of Engineering, Architecture & Computer Sciences is one of 12 colleges within Howard University and is made up in turn of two divisions, the School of Engineering and Computer Sciences and the School of Architecture and Design. Graduates of any one of the six academic departments within these schools are expected to be skilled in finding new and creative solutions to problems requiring design, technological, and scientific knowledge applied in new ways. Critical thinking and leadership skills are also valued in all of the programs here and integrated into coursework, leading to graduates who are adept at research and lifelong learning geared towards solving problems on both a national and global level.

Bachelor of Science in Systems and Computer Science

The Bachelor of Science in Systems and Computer Science from the Department of Systems and Computer Science emphasizes software engineering and computer engineering with particular interests in the software/hardware interface. The degree requires a total of 120 credit hours, broken down into 60 hours in arts and sciences or social sciences courses, 48 hours in computer science courses, and 12 hours in engineering technical courses at the senior level. In addition, students are highly encouraged to complete an informal internship over at least one summer in a computer-oriented lab, either on the campus of Howard University or at another computer facility. Within the major, students can track toward specific interests in computer science by taking specific coursework in areas such as gaming and interactive media, cybersecurity, computational biology, mathematics, chemistry, or physics, and computer education. Research is a valued element in all of the tracks, and students are also encouraged to undertake an undergraduate research project as part of their path to this degree.

Non-Engineering Minor in Computer Science

The goal of the Minor in Computer Science is to give students a solid foundation in computer science knowledge and is to be offered to students who are seeking degrees from departments that are otherwise not affiliated with the computer science academic department. It requires a total of five courses that add up to 15 credit hours and include an introduction to computer science course and at least two general computer science courses. The other courses are chosen from a list that includes specific interests that would complement the major degree being sought. Some of the choices include courses in computer organization, database systems, discrete structures, large scale programming, human and computer interaction, and computer and video gaming development. Some of these courses also have related prerequisites that would dictate what other optional courses are to be taken first and as part of the minor degree.

Master of Computer Science

The Master of Computer Science degree offers a much more comprehensive knowledge than the undergraduate degree, gained through coursework that offers both theory and practice. Students will take several core courses and then combine these with a desired area of specialization. In addition to the standard 30 credit hours for completion of the Master of Computer Science degree, students must also complete the Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop, attend a month-long workshop on Research Methods, and complete the Expository Writing Exam. The initial 15 credit hours for this degree come from prescribed courses in Advanced Algorithms, Advanced Software Engineering, Advanced Operating Systems, Computer Architecture, and Computability and Complexity. From here, students choose to either follow a thesis option or a project option, both involving a total of 24 credit hours of courses and six credit hours dedicated to either thesis or project. Within the 24 credit hours, students must take a minimum of three courses in their chosen area of specialization to complement the initial 15 hours in core courses.

Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) in Computer Science

The PhD in Computer Science degree requires students to declare both a major and a minor, with the major required to be in one of several available specializations. The choices for specialization are Software Engineering, Cybersecurity, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Networks, Computing Systems, Computational Science, and Computer Science Education. The minor can be in an alternate computer science specialization or in any other specialization offered in any other degree program, provided the choice of minor is approved by the student’s major advisor. All in all, the PhD in Computer Science degree requires a total of 60 credit hours in coursework and 12 hours in dissertation. In addition, students who did not previously earn their graduate degree from Howard University are required to complete the Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop and complete the Expository Writing Exam, in addition to having completed 18 credit hours in courses comparable to the core courses required for the Master of Computer Science degree from Howard University.

Accreditations

  • Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET)

Contact Information

College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences
Howard University
2400 Sixth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20059
202-806-6565
lfleming@Howard.edu
http://www.howard.edu/ceacs/

The Catholic University of America

School of Engineering

The Catholic University of America enjoys its reputation as a small, private college able to offer a personal touch and strong interactions between students and faculty. The School of Engineering boasts several top of the line computer laboratories and smart technology classrooms, earning it the title of one of the most wired university campuses on the list compiled by the Princeton Review and Forbes Magazine. This school emphasizes research and scholarship, but also teaches with a view to each individual’s social and moral responsibility to use the knowledge gained for ethically solving problems on both a national and global level.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree is gained from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science within the School of Engineering. This degree is intended to provide students a broad foundation of knowledge in several areas of computer science and instill in them a love of learning that will hopefully last a lifetime. Emphasis is on critical thinking skills and creativity in finding ethical solutions to technological problems while in service to society as a whole. Hands-on training is integrated into all four years of this degree path, with a culminating Senior Design Project that allows students to practice what they have learned and prepare for the real world culmination of landing a job upon degree completion. Students will be equally prepared to enter the workforce in the computer science field or to seek further education at the graduate level, as social skills such as effective teamwork and communication strategies are taught alongside technical courses.

Master of Science in Computer Science

The Master of Science in Computer Science degree builds from the Bachelor degree in this field in that it narrows the focus of study to four specific areas of concentration. Courses in these areas must be used to make up the core courses for this degree, with at least three semester credit hours from each. The areas of concentration are Computer Science Foundations, Computer Systems, Software Systems, and Computing Methodologies. Core courses total 18 credit hours and combine with 12 credit hours of electives to comprise the 30 credit hour total needed for completion of the degree program. In addition, students entering this graduate program must choose either a thesis or non-thesis option when they begin. Regardless of which option is chosen, a program of study must be submitted by the student to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science for approval.

Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) in Computer Science

Students seeking a PhD in Computer Science degree must have completed a Masters degree and maintained a GPA of 3.4 or higher throughout the Masters program. Students who received their Masters degree from the Catholic University of America can continue on to the PhD degree by completing an additional eight classes and completing a doctoral dissertation supervised by a select faculty member. Students are also required to complete a comprehensive exam following the coursework and prior to receiving the degree. In addition, and upon completion of the dissertation, an oral examination of the dissertation must be passed as a requirement of this degree. Students who graduate with a PhD in Computer Science will not only be considered to be at the top of their field of specialty, but could also find employment in teaching other students in the lesser degree programs, whether at the Catholic University of America or elsewhere.

Accreditations

  • Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET)

Contact Information

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
The Catholic University of America
620 Michigan Avenue, N.E.
Washington, DC 20064
202-319-5000
http://eecs.cua.edu/

The George Washington University

School of Engineering and Applied Science

The School of Engineering and Applied Science at The George Washington University offers five pathways to various degrees, including accredited degrees in computer science in the District of Columbia through its Computer Science division. In addition to constantly striving to maintain a multicultural presence in the higher education scene of Washington D.C., the School of Engineering and Applied Science maintains solid relationships with many of the area’s federal agencies and high tech companies, providing for internship opportunities. Students are able to be part of the vibrant science and engineering community while still in school, often forging connections that will serve them well upon graduation.

Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science

The Bachelor of Arts in computer science degree from The George Washington University is designed for students pulling a double major or a computer science major with two minors in secondary fields. It provides foundational knowledge in computer science while providing for a lot of leeway in choosing courses from other disciplines to make up either the second major or the minor degrees. This is a four-year program, with 60 credit hours required beyond the initial two years of general education requirements. These are generally split into 24 to 30 credit hours of computer science courses and either a minimum of 33 credit hours in a secondary field or secondary major or 15 credit hours each in two secondary fields or minors. In addition, students seeking a Bachelor of Arts in computer science must complete a significant independent project, either a thesis or project in the secondary major or completion of three computer science courses involving research and a senior project.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

The Bachelor of Science in computer science degree is the choice of students who plan to enter the workforce in a computer science field or move on to graduate studies in this field following completion of the bachelor program. It provides a strong foundation in core subjects within the computer science field, a strong background in mathematics, science, and communication, and a culminating senior project that mirrors real world project development. Students will learn fundamentals in computer science, such as discrete structures, algorithms, and theory, then also have a solid foundation in both hardware and software engineering, including architecture, languages, databases, operating systems, and networks. The senior project is a challenging Capstone project that involves theory, design, and implementation. Upon graduation, students are prepared to seek gainful employment in the computer and IT industry or to continue into a more advanced graduate degree, whether in computer science or any number of other fields, including medicine and law.

Minor in Computer Science

The secondary field, or minor, in computer science at The George Washington University is for students of other disciplines with the school who wish to complement their studies with fundamental knowledge of computer science. It consists of 18 credit hours, made up of four core courses and then electives. The core courses are Introduction to Software Development, Discrete Structures, Algorithm and Data Structures, and Software Engineering. For electives, students are required to choose two courses within the computer science discipline that are numbered CSCI 2113 or above, or obtain permission from their secondary field advisor to substitute other course instead. Students seeking a minor in computer science may also be seeking a major degree within the School of Engineering and Applied Science but in a field other than computer science.

Master of Science in Computer Science

The Master of Science in computer science degree requires an additional 30 credit hours beyond the achievement of Bachelor of Science degree and generally requires about two further years of study. While no area of concentration is required, students must have at least 24 credit hours, or eight out of the ten required courses, taken at the 6000 level or above, including three required core courses for this degree. In addition, students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average as a minimum throughout the program or risk being expelled from it. Two or more grades of F will result in expulsion, as will three or more grades of B-. In addition to the Master of Science in computer science degree, The George Washington University also now offers a new but related degree of Master of Science in Cybersecurity, the first of its kind in Washington D.C. While this program overlaps with the traditional Master of Science in computer science degree, it also has some unique requirements, such that students can not be in both programs at the same time.

Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) in Computer Science

The PhD in Computer Science program can be entered directly from the Bachelor program, in which case it would encompass and combine the requirements for a Master of Science degree with the requirements for the PhD, or following achievement of a Master of Science degree. In the latter case, 18 credit hours of course work and 12 credit hours of dissertation research credits are required. This degree seeks to involve students in major methods of computer research at the graduate level, encompassing the three areas of theory, systems, and applications. Students will take at least one course in each of these three areas and at least one course labeled “Advanced’ at the graduate level. In addition, electives may be chosen outside of the computer science discipline, but with a maximum of nine credit hours for the post-Master’s students and a maximum of 15 credit hours for students seeking the PhD directly following the Bachelor degree.

Accreditations

  • Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET)

Contact Information

Tompkins Hall of Engineering
725 23rd Street NW
Washington, DC 20052
202-994-6080
slittle@gwu.edu
http://www.seas.gwu.edu

University of the District of Columbia

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

The University of the District of Columbia is a public and urban land grant university offering degrees ranging from Associate level to Master and Professional Certificate level in several areas, including engineering and applied sciences and encompassing computer science. The School of Engineering and Applied Sciences prepares students for high powered careers in both engineering and computer science. Small classes, close collaboration between faculty and students, and mentoring all play a part in the success of graduates from this university and school. Graduates often find themselves in key management positions within government or top engineering firms and are actively recruited from nationwide firms.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science program is a four-year program and is designed to prepare students to enter the workforce at a technical or scientific level, or to proceed to more advanced graduate studies in this field. Emphasis is on mathematics and algorithmic processes to both describe and transform information. The overall Bachelor of Science degree requires a minimum of 122 credit hours completed and a grade point average of at least 2.0 to graduate. Courses that are available within the computer science field include instruction on programming, networking, software engineering, operating systems, and web development. In addition, while not required, students may choose to take a series of courses involved in completing a Capstone senior project that will provide more in-depth and hands-on experience in both theory and application of computer science principles.

Master of Science in Computer Science

The Master of Science in Computer Science degree at the University of the District of Columbia is designed to meet the needs of both traditional students and working professionals in the DC area who wish to advance their education. The curriculum is a more in-depth approach to subjects covered in the Bachelor of Science program, with an emphasis on practical experience. The curriculum includes subjects such as advanced algorithms, network security, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, image processing, software systems, and database systems. Students choose either a thesis option or a non-thesis option. The degree requires completion of 30 credit hours with a grade of B or better. Students take four core courses in computer science, totally 12 credit hours, and then either 12 or 18 credit hours in either four or six computer science electives, depending on whether they chose the thesis option or not. Those choosing the thesis option would then add six thesis credit hours to the 12 computer science elective credit hours.

Accreditations

  • Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET)

Contact Information

Office of the Dean
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Building 42, Suite 212
4200 Connecticut Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20008
202-274-5220
seas@udc.edu
https://www.udc.edu/school_of_engineering_and_applied_sciences/school_of_engineering_and_applied_sciences

As the nation’s capital and the seat of the federal government, as well as many world-renowned cultural and historical venues in need of highly qualified graduates in the computer science fields, Washington D.C.has many opportunities awaiting graduates of its world-class establishments of higher education. Regardless of where you decide to seek an accredited degree in computer science in the District of Columbia, you have several very different but all strongly viable options for your education.

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